California Citrus State Historic Park

EFFECTIVE (Oct. 2, 2020) - Thank you for your patience and continued support of California State Parks as we work to limit your risk for exposure to COVID-19 in the outdoors. The museum and visitor center have reopened at reduced capacity.

As a reminder, Californians are encouraged to avoid road trips and stay close to home, maintain physical distancing, wear a face covering when a physical distance of six feet from others who are not from the immediate household members cannot be maintained, and avoid congregating. Everyone has the responsibility to slow down the spread of COVID-19.

Here are some additional guidelines for locals visiting California Citrus State Historic Park: 

What is open now?
  • The park is open from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.
  • Limited parking is now available to the public. 
  • No transactions at entrance station. APM or Pay by Phone only.
  • Trails - all active recreation will be permitted such as hiking, running, mountain biking, and bird watching, and equestrian use rules and regulations are now posted at all trailheads and will continue to be enforced.
  • BBQ’s, picnic tables and benches.
  • Only restrooms in the proximity of the parking lots will be available.
  • Museum and visitor center have reopened from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday at reduced capacity.

What is currently closed?
  • Group picnic and amphitheater are available by visiting the Facility Rentals tab on the right.

Are there any new visitor guidelines?
Yes, please see below:

  • Stay Safer at 6 Feet: Maintain a physical distance of 6 feet or more. Gatherings, picnics and parties are not allowed. Visitors will be asked to leave if there are too many people at the park to allow for the required physical distance.
  • Stay Clean: Be prepared. Bring soap/sanitizer and pack out all trash. Restrooms will be temporarily closed in order to keep up with cleaning schedules.
  • Stay Covered: The state now requires you to wear a face covering in most indoor settings and public outdoor spaces when you cannot maintain physical distancing of six feet or more from people outside of your immediate household. For details, please visit CDPH’s guidance here. Visitors should also abide by their local county health orders.

Statewide, California State Parks continues to work with locals on a phased and regionally-driven approach to increase access to state park units where compliance with state and local public health ordinances can be achieved. Even though the department has increased access across the State Park System, the need for Californians to slow the spread of COVID-19 in the outdoors remains critical.

For information on statewide current closures and available services, please visit parks.ca.gov/FlattenTheCurve.

Phone Number

(951) 780-6222

Park Hours

Park Hours: Daily 8am-5pm

Visitor Center: Sat.-Sun. 10am-3pm
No tours or fruit tastings. We have self-guided tour maps.

Dogs Allowed?

Yes
Dogs allowed on the trails. Dogs not allowed in the visitor center/museum. 

Driving Directions to California Citrus SHP

The park is located in Riverside, one mile east of the 91 Freeway. In the Arlington Heights - Lake Matthews area of Riverside.

Online reservations are not available for this park.

Upcoming Park Events

No events scheduled at this moment.

TRAIL USE
Bike Trails
Hiking Trails
DAY-USE ACTIVITIES & FACILITIES
Historical/Cultural Site
Picnic Areas
Env. Learning/Visitor Center
Exhibits and Programs
Guided Tours
Interpretive Exhibits
Vista Point
Nature & Wildlife Viewing
Museums
Family Programs
Geocaching
OTHER FACILITIES & VISITOR INFORMATION
Parking
Restrooms
Drinking Water Available

Preserving the Cultural Landscape of the Citrus Industry

This park interprets the industry's role in the history and development of California through the stories of the diverse groups of people who made it all possible. The park recaptures the complexities of the time when "Citrus was King," exploring the significance of the citrus industry in Southern California. 

In 1873, the U.S. Department of Agriculture forever changed the history of Southern California when it sent two small navel orange trees to Riverside resident Eliza Tibbets. Those trees, growing in ideal soil and weather conditions, produced an especially sweet and flavorful winter harvest fruit.  Word of this far superior orange quickly spread, and a great agricultural industry was born.

In the early 1900s, an effort to promote citrus ranching in the state brought hundreds of would-be citrus barons as well as thousands of migrant and immigrant agricultural workers to California for the "second Gold Rush."  This resulted in the growth of cities and communities throughout Southern California, most of which were segregated along class and racial lines.  On the surface, however, the lush groves of oranges, lemons and grapefruit contributed to California's legacy - its lingering image as the Golden State - the land of sunshine and opportunity.